Tesla to greatly expand Supercharging in Iceland with partnership with gas stations

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Tesla announced plans to greatly expand the Supercharger network in Iceland through a partnership with a gas station chain.

Iceland is perfect for the massive adoption of electric vehicles. The island’s electricity generation is already almost 100% renewable, which makes EVs super clean, and being a remote island, petrol is expensive.

Albeit being sparsely populated with only ~350,000 people, there’s a significant concentration of population around Reykjavík, and people have relatively short commutes that can be covered with most electric vehicles.

Tesla has made an investment in the country by building a Supercharger network on the whole island, which it opened to all electric vehicles in 2022.

The investment paid off as Tesla became the best-selling car brand in the country in 2023 with a massive 20% market share. The Model Y also demolished a 35-year record for the best-selling car in the country.

Now, Tesla is looking to expand its charging infrastructure in the country to support the growing fleet. The automaker announced a deal with N1, a gas station operator, to deploy 20 new Superchargers across the country:

That’s a massive expansion, considering Tesla currently only operates 9 Supercharger stations in Iceland:

Iceland has put in place incentives for car rental companies to update their fleet with electric vehicles – making it easier to drive electric for people visiting.

Tesla vehicles are obviously a popular choice for those rental fleets and they are going to need charging. This new deal with N1 should help accelerate that transition.

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